Gray Fox Pups

An adult Gray Fox cautiously watches me from the den site.
An adult Gray Fox cautiously watches me from the den site.

I’d been informed that someone, a Museum Guest, had spotted gray fox pups just off the trail in Explore the Wild. I’d seen an adult in this area many times during the past few months so it was no surprise, but I was excited at the prospect of getting photos of the pups.

As I stolled past the site, one of the adults huffed and barked at me and retreated down into the gully that’s beside the path near the Secondary Wetlands Overlook. She, or he, was protecting the litter, some of which I could see behind the adult.

You can see one of the pups to the right of the adult and what looks like a part of the other adult on the left.
You can see one of the pups to the right of the adult and what looks like a part of the other adult on the left.

A few seconds later a couple of much younger faces popped into view.

One of the pups licks the parents face the other approaches.
One of the pups licks the parent’s face, the other looks on.

 

A little gray pups stares up at mom (or dad).
A little gray pup stares up at mom (or dad).

Welcome to the world little foxes.

By the way, these are wild fox, not part of an exhibit. If you happen to encounter these fox, or any wild creature here at the Museum, please keep a safe distance. This reminder is for both your safety and that of the animals.

3 responses to Gray Fox Pups

  1. Avatar
    Paula says:

    Ranger Greg, Did you notice that one of the fox pups seems to have paralyzed back legs? Is there anything that can be done?

  2. Avatar
    Carol Henderson says:

    5/24/14 Question for Ranger Greg. I saw a bird on the wetland today that looked like a small type of heron. When the sun illuminated the wings they were blue. Do you know what he/she is? He was hanging out on one of the islands on the wetland.

    • Greg Dodge
      Greg Dodge says:

      It was most likely a Green Heron. I admit that the wings and back don’t look green most of the time but when seen in certain lighting conditions they do, especially the back. In fact, at one time Green Herons were called Green-backed Herons. However, no part of the bird looks green as in “grass green,” there’s a lot of blue mixed in. I suppose it could’ve been named the Blue-green Heron. There’s already a Little Blue Heron which is blue, so that’s out.
      Green heron.
      Thanks,

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