Things to look for

As you stroll around the Outdoor Exhibits area there are many opportunities to see some very exciting sights, if you find plants, insects, and reptiles and amphibians exciting, that is. Besides the bears, wolves, lemurs, and all the great stuff in Catch the Wind there are wild creatures and plants trying to make a living out there amongst and between the exhibits. If you do find the wild fauna and flora exciting, then you’re in luck, many fruits and nutsRead more

Finally, Juveniles!

I’ve been doing a lot of complaining lately about not being able to find any Green Treefrog juveniles in or around the Wetlands. It’s August, mid-August, and there should be some juveniles clinging to the vegetation surrounding the muddy water of our Wetlands. On Wednesday (8/15), I found two of the little green gems sitting on the lance-shaped leaves of the smartweed at the end of the Boardwalk in Explore the Wild. There were also a few adults down inRead more

Where are the Frogs?

I’ve been meeting nearly every week with Summer Campers at the Museum as part of a behind the scenes program where the campers get a glimpse of what the staff here at the Museum does as part of their normal routine. When they meet with me we conduct a survey of the Green Treefrogs around the Wetlands. Each week I have the campers fill out a data sheet with information such as the current weather conditions (temp, humidity, pressure, andRead more

Good Morning Frog!

As I walked up to the Butterfly House this morning I saw Emily staring down at the ground near the outside entrance to the Lep Lab. She was looking at a little frog on the storm drain in front of the doors. “Good morning frog!” ” Morn’n Emily!” Relatives of Emily’s little friend are quite active now, out in the Wetlands. Besides the very vocal treefrogs that are calling on these hot, humid, and thunderstorm prone July days, there areRead more

Black Light Insect Hunt

It was still light as I arrived at the Museum of Life and Science’s Third Annual Black Light Insect Hunt. Many Chimney Swifts along with a few bats were flying low over the Wetlands, hawking insects. As the light faded, more and more bats joined the swirling mass. Soon, the swifts disappeared leaving the night skies to the bats, and to the insects of the night. Mercury vapor and black lights were set up in front of white sheets inRead more