Winter

Hiking around the outdoor loops here at the museum can be rewarding, you never know what you’ll come across. Even though I’ve walked these trails for some eleven years now I and my fellow rangers are still finding new things to discover. A few weeks ago, Ranger Martha discovered a group of earthstar mushrooms on the Dinosaur Trail. Initially, earthstars look like onions. Eventually the outer “onion” layer splits open creating a star-shaped platform on which sits a small ball-shapedRead more

Pumpkins

What do you do when you’re a six month old red wolf and your keepers (animal keepers) put pumpkins in your enclosure. First you stare at them. Then, if you can fit them in your mouth, you pick them up and walk around with them.Read more

The Wolves ID’d

After posting to this blog recently in regards to red wolf identification and my inability to confidently discern our young wolves from one another here at the museum “…whatever differences the two pups had which distinguished them from one another have disappeared, at least to my eyes. I can no longer tell one from the other,” and experiencing a bit of ribbing and ridicule (light-hearted, of course) from fellow staff and volunteers about my observational failings, I decided to setRead more

Season Changes and The Wolves

Migration has been underway for several months. Most of the northern insectivorous birds have passed us by for warmer climates. The majority of our local insect-eating birds have long since departed. Some still linger, like catbird, but they’re on their way out. Granivores like juncos, white-throated sparrows and others will arrive soon. It can’t be long before the butter-butts (yellow-rumped warblers) come in. I heard a yellow-bellied sapsucker the other day. Our winter visiting hooded mergansers should arrive next month.Read more

August Has Gone By

August is over and we’re sliding into fall. Here’s a small sampling of sights I witnessed this past month above and beyond what I’ve previously posted. At the top and below are pictures of Bembix wasps. The various, rather gentle, non-aggressive wasp species in the Bembix genus burrow into sand to house and feed their young. They feed the larvae flies. They’re often called sand wasps. The picture above is of a Bembix wasp standing at the entrance to itsRead more

The Wean Begins

Our female red wolf (#2062) nurses her two young pups. It’s been just about six weeks since their birth and nearing time for weaning. None too soon, judging by our female’s expressions and actions in the accompanying photos. Don’t fret, our female is taking very good care of the pups. They’re both healthy and growing. It’s all part of the process.Read more

Red Wolf or…?

If you’re walking down the 750′ boardwalk here at the museum on your way to see the red wolf pups (born April 20) and you happen to spot one or two canine creatures just past where the boardwalk levels out and makes a sharp left turn, don’t be alarmed. They are not escaped red wolf pups. If you’re wondering where the mother is, again, don’t worry. She’s nearby. She, and perhaps the father, may be watching you through the surroundingRead more

More Red Wolf Pups

Just some photos of the Red Wolves from Friday (5/18/18). Top: Pup #2246 stands at entrance to man-made den in Red Wolf Enclosure. Now that the enclosure is open, stop by. But remember, keep the noise and movement down, whisper if you need to communicate something, and most importantly, enjoy the view.Read more

Red Wolf Pups

Just a few photos of the red wolf pups. Visitation is increasing as we begin to allow more and more escorted museum guests to enter the overlook to view the wolves. The photos were taken as the wolves occupied a dug-out “den” in the exposed roots of a cut-off pine tree near the center of the enclosure, an easy spot from the overlook. The pictures were taken Wednesday (5/16). Today (5/17), the pups were in the den and viewable onRead more

Red Wolf Speculation

Red wolf mating season has come and gone. The first confirmed mating was on February 14, nearly two months ago. Average gestation period for these canids is 63 days. The photo above shows a comparison of our female then and now. The left side of the photo shows her in mid December 2017, the right side, April 5, Thursday of last week. Do you see a difference? Here’s another shot of female 2062’s belly taken same day as right sideRead more