Pumpkins

What do you do when you’re a six month old red wolf and your keepers (animal keepers) put pumpkins in your enclosure. First you stare at them. Then, if you can fit them in your mouth, you pick them up and walk around with them.Read more

The Wolves ID’d

After posting to this blog recently in regards to red wolf identification and my inability to confidently discern our young wolves from one another here at the museum “…whatever differences the two pups had which distinguished them from one another have disappeared, at least to my eyes. I can no longer tell one from the other,” and experiencing a bit of ribbing and ridicule (light-hearted, of course) from fellow staff and volunteers about my observational failings, I decided to setRead more

Merganser Are Back

Hooded mergansers typically arrive in our wetlands in November, from the first to third week in November. A trio showed up today (10/20) at the end of the third week of October. The birds usually get right to the business of pair-bonding upon arrival. The bonds are formed here on the wintering grounds and reinforced throughout the season. When, sometime next March and April, the birds head back north to the breeding areas the pairs are already formed and theyRead more

Copperhead Encounter

It’s no secret that copperheads occur in the Carolina Piedmont. In fact, they’re found throughout the state. To the dismay of some the non aggressive yet venomous snake can often be seen in suburban back yards. We have our own population here at the Museum of Life and Science. Here, they’re typically encountered during spring and fall as they move back and forth between their summer and winter quarters. I sometimes see them crossing paths following heavy rains. All ofRead more

TACO Week

No, TACO Week doesn’t mean we here at the museum will be making, serving, or eating tacos, although you can eat tacos that week if you desire. TACO Week is short for Take A Child Outdoors Week. You should already be doing that, taking your kids out of doors, as often as you can. But, this is just a reminder, an excuse, in case it slipped your mind. This year, TACO Week is from 24 thru 30 September. Though we’reRead more

Red Wolf Speculation

Red wolf mating season has come and gone. The first confirmed mating was on February 14, nearly two months ago. Average gestation period for these canids is 63 days. The photo above shows a comparison of our female then and now. The left side of the photo shows her in mid December 2017, the right side, April 5, Thursday of last week. Do you see a difference? Here’s another shot of female 2062’s belly taken same day as right sideRead more

Sailboat Pond, Bright and Shiny

Back in February, we began the process of performing some much-needed maintenance on the Sailboat Pond in Catch the Wind, a favorite of the thousands of kids that make their way through our outdoor exhibit area. The pond’s bottom and walls needed to be resurfaced and a new plumbing system installed. The pond needed to be drained, scooped out, scraped and painted, a dirty and messy job. The last time this type of maintenance was performed was in May ofRead more

Out For a Walk

You never know who you’ll come across out on the paths here at the Museum. Out for a stroll in the warm sunshine yesterday (above, l-r) were Sarah, Lightning, Cooper, Chris, and Terrence. It seems all were in a happy, springtime mood.Read more

Quiz Bird

Here’s a photo of a bird taken on 18 January, the day after our most recent snow event. The bird’s head and other parts of its anatomy are obscured by a branch as it soars above a tree. You can, however, see all you need to see to identify what species it is. By the way, it’s a common bird in our area (NC piedmont). Respond by sending a comment (below) with what bird you think it is. Though it’sRead more

Who’s Who

Just a quick revisit with our red wolves and to reinforce who’s who. Top photo: Female #2062 left and male #1803 right. Both wolves may be active throughout the day. The keepers, however, typically enter the enclosure in mid morning to clean up and randomly place food around the habitat. Following the keepers’ departure the wolves can be seen sniffing out the bits of food left by their attendants. Have fun!Read more