It’s all About the Snout

Top Photo: An older photo of three of our bears. Our three adult black bears can each be identified by muzzle only, though it may take a little practice. But first, how do you tell male from female in the Black Bear Exhibit? Male black bears (we have one, Gus) have longer, straighter legs, bigger heads and longer necks, and a more angular body shape. Females tend to be more rounded or rotund. Even though the photo above is tenRead more

The Little Bear Update

Top Photo: Gus Bear and Little Bear feed on food tossed out by Animal Care Team, nuts, sweet potatoes, carrots, berries… Just to remind everyone the best time to spot our newest black bear is in the morning. The secondary black bear overlook remains the best location to get a glimpse of the “Little Bear.” She’s staying out longer each day and seems to be adapting well. I’ll see you there.Read more

Groundhogs, a Little Bear, and a Hawk

Top Photo: Oak stump and resident groundhog. Strolling through Wander Away in Catch the Wind, I noticed a gray, furry head poking out from the side of a large oak stump on the side of the path. I immediately stopped and reached for my camera. Inching forward, I was able to get a few shots of the young groundhog whose head was posed at the entrance to its burrow, its nose twitching for scent. Groundhogs are fairly common sights hereRead more

Bears, Burls, and Butter-butts

Top Photo: Mimi bear (right) and Gus bear. After grazing on some winter grass, Mimi bear seemed to be headed for the culvert pipe attraction in her enclosure to slip inside for a nap. Gus bear was already engaged. With a sidelong glance at the slumbering male bear, Mimi slinked off to greener pastures. Recently, Ranger Brooke found a small piece of pine branch with a growth attached. She asked me what I thought it was. I reasoned it aRead more

Familiar Faces

If you’ve spent any time walking the paths at the Museum of Life and Science, the following faces may be familiar to you. All of them, save one, are residents in some form. Above (banner photo) is one of our ring-tailed lemurs (Satyrus). Snakes are always a possibilty, even in winter. If you do see a snake during winter it’s probably a brown snake or possibly a garter snake. Everyone has seen one or more of our four black bearsRead more

Mimi

It’s well known here at the Museum that black bear Mimi likes a little wade in the pool every now and then. Here, she chills at the waterfall on a hot and humid day.Read more

The Ice Is Upon Us

If you’ve had to go outside of your house lately, you’re no doubt aware that it’s cold out there. I spend a good part of the day outside. I confirm. It’s cold! Our wetland doesn’t often freeze, once each year, if at all. It’s annual freeze has come. We have two water features, besides the wetlands, on our outdoor acreage, a waterfall in each of the black bear and red wolf enclosures. The waterfall in the black bear enclosure neverRead more

Yellow-bellied

I was standing at the Secondary Black Bear Overlook. A whiny, scratchy, mew sound was coming from the shrubs just inside the chain-link fence and to the left. I knew from the sound that it was a yellow-bellied sapsucker, but I couldn’t see the bird. The woodpecker was making quite a bit of noise, but where was it. Finally, I could see the fresh wells drilled by the bird. The wells were on the main trunk of a viburnum whichRead more

Opportunist

The Animal Keepers cleaned the bear pool this week. The pools of water at the base of the Main Black Bear Overlook need to be cleaned every six months. The ponds collect much debris and algae and need cleaning. The cleaning often exposes all sorts of creatures, from crayfish to frogs. This exposition sometimes attracts opportunistic predators. It’s well known here at the Museum that red-shouldered hawks wait silently on perches along the edges of the Wetlands or in the swampRead more

FLASH! Marked Turtle Seen In Wetlands

On Friday (3/15), a Yellow-bellied Slider bearing a notch in her shell was seen basking on a log next to the Main Wetlands Overlook. This turtle was marked last year by myself as part of a turtle survey. It could not be determined which of some dozen turtles it was since only one notch was visible (some of the turtles have notches on both sides of their shells, left and right), however, it was clearly one of last year’s subjects.Read more