A Cooper’s Hawk

Cooper’s hawks are not uncommon here in Durham. Even so, I was surprised to see one perched in a willow 15 – 20 feet off the path in a black willow. The hawk watched intently as a dozen or so butter-butts flitted around the nearby wax myrtle bushes. Cooper’s hawks are almost exclusively bird eaters. When the warblers moved on, the hawk settled in for a bit of preening. Cooper’s hawks are one of three accipiters (long-tailed, forest hunting hawks)Read more

Cooper’s Hawk or What!

I was very excited when I first spotted the bird in the above photo. I was making the final run of the day, driving from Explore the Wild into Catch the Wind. Glancing over at the swamp between those two areas of the outdoor exhibits I saw the hawk perched about twenty some feet above the floor of the swamp on my left. Why the excitement over a Cooper’s Hawk? I see them fairly often here at the Museum throughout theRead more

Do you see what I see?

There, just behind the main branch running diagonally from bottom left to top right, in the center of the photo, is a Cooper’s Hawk. The bird’s back is towards us. The hawk’s tail is hanging down from behind the branch, its upper body and head above it among the leaves. I’ve been seeing Cooper’s Hawks a least once per day for the past two weeks, sometimes two or three times a day. The hawk in the photo, an immature bird, wasRead more